Climate: If it’s not a crisis, newspapers can’t be bothered

Talked to my mom last night, and mentioned to her that the Midwest is experiencing a heat wave the likes of which no one alive has ever really seen. 

The experts have been floored for a week. It's "unprecedented." Thousands of records broken.  


Jeff Masters' weather historian: "It's almost like science fiction –" Bill McKibben: "This is what climate change looks like." In Michigan, lows for the day (53 degrees) that are higher than the previous high for the date (49). "That's incredible — to me, that's just mind-boggling," said Mike Halpert, of a NOAA climate center. 

"I didn't know about that!" said my mom, a little perturbed. As the proud daughter of an eminent meteorologist, she's always been interested in weather, and she's also a person who reads two newspapers a day, and three a week. Yet the papers haven't mentioned it. 

Because it's March, and unusually pleasant in the MidWest, news of the heat wave has yet ot make the front page of the Times, the Post, the Los Angeles Times, or my paper, to the best of my knowledge. Certainly hasn't made a splash, even though the President himself wondered at the possibility of global warming, on a campaign swing. "It gets you a little nervous about what's happening –" Obama said. 

Almost as if it could be due to climate change. 

 To which ABC News' Ginger Zee replies:
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Essentially, yes.

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  1. pf

    As predicted in your post on 3/4/2012, this must be wreaking havoc on amphibians, along with all the other species that emerge from their eggs based on degree-days.

    March 23, 2012
  2. Kit Stolz

    Great point. In SoCal, frog deaths are being attributed to invasive species and a fungus bought by them to the environment, but apparently not harmful to the most common species, tree frogs. But why now? Still trying to get to the bottom of this question, which is being actively researched in the county.

    March 25, 2012